A hormone and ego induced Baptismal gown Part 2

Posted By on Oct 1, 2010 | 5 comments


The fractured fantasies of a Christening Gown Masterpiece continue, outlining the TO DOs and NOT TO DOs of making your own Baptism gown...

Well, I didn't end up making this gown for my son, by the time I was ready to Baptise him, he was about 5  months old and the size of an 18 month old baby (no exaggeration), making him way too big for any gown.  He had a cute little suit though instead.

Christening gown

Christening gown

HOWEVER....I was determined to foist my creative genius and talent (yes, there's still room to breathe) and so waited for baby #2. 

I decided to get someone else to sew the dress- BIG MISTAKE, and she did a really bad job of it.  It really ticked me off because I have a slightly better sewing capacity than she demonstrated on this gown, and I chose her because she did wedding gowns, and had a sample of it in her shop, which led me to believe she was competent.

The only good thing that came of it was the French lace she attached to all the trims.  I had to redo the buttons, unpick the sleeves and fix the ribbon trims.  I don't want to relive all the angst about the rest of what was wrong...mmm, I'll just add this last bit, there was black machine grease on the white garment, and I'll leave it at that.

So, I started embellishing the dress after my daughter was born, leaving me 3 months to complete the silk ribbon embroidery panel (which quickly reduced in size once I'd started), glass beadwork and additional ribbon trims and headband.  The yoke of the dress was sewn crookedly, so I had to space out the yoke design to visually detract from the seamstresses poor effort.  This was my 4th silk ribbon embroidery project since I started learning, and I completed this project at home, and designed it myself.

Yoke of Baptism Gown

Yoke of Baptism Gown

Sleeve of Baptism Gown

Sleeve of Baptism Gown

I think I was getting somewhat better at downsizing my grandiose plans!

I embroidered this panel onto a piece of gauze type / see through fabric and then attached it on to the dress.  All of the little white forget me not flowers were hand sewn and attached with glass beads in the centre.  I used a range of contrasting silk ribbons and silk thread so that the dress had a warmer feel to it rather than a cold white.  I used  gorgeous panels of ribbon to break up the dress and edge the panel (as well as cover most of the bad sewing- I know I said I wouldn't keep going on about it).  I hand sewed all the ribbon panelling- except for around this section of the dress- I had had enough! And by this time, the Baptism was a week away, and I had cakes and a party to put on.

After sore fingers, and late nights (well, what else do you do during night feeds?), and new set of reading glasses, I completed my masterpiece.

Bottom trim of Baptism Gown

Bottom trim of Baptism Gown

Head band which I sewed, I used a pre bought flower for the centre

Head band which I sewed, I used a pre bought flower for the centre

What will I do with the gown?

I have decided that I will cut up the dress and create a collage/crazy quilt picture to frame of the best parts of the dress, her headband and other little embellishments she received as gifts.  This way it won't be sitting in a box- and I can breathe new life into my hormone and ego induced Baptism Masterpiece!

Thanks for reading my mini saga about my sewing and embroidery efforts, I'd like to know if you've taken on a crafting or sewing project and realised you may have been a little out of your depth?!

468 ad

5 Comments

  1. Gorgeous work & I love that you are going to display it afterwards…but then again, all that love & all that work…maybe kept for another little baby (grandchild) to wear…? 😉

    Post a Reply
    • Ta Kim, I decided not to keep it for another baby to wear, as my daughter or future daughter in law? may want to make or have their own. But I thought that the best way of keeping it would be to recreate it into a framed memory, which if my daughter wants to later, can open it up, unpick it and use parts of it if she wants for her child’s gown. I am also get a black and white/sepia print of my daughter from the Baptism, printed on a section of the fabric of her dress to complete the collage.

      Post a Reply
  2. Usually, the majority of baptism gowns are actually extended robes, however the girls baptism outfit really can be any kind of size. In case a wedding dress appears as well official,…christening outfits

    Post a Reply

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Why I joined the Crazy Quilt Journal Project (CQJP) 2015 Challenge | Ingrid Creates Online Arts School - […] before or crazy quilting, so this will be something new.  I'm not new to embellishing, see here, here; however…

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *